Our Stories

4.18.2019 -

A Model Worth Copying: Joint Ownership Structures for CDCs

In an in-depth article for The Journal of Affordable Housing and Community Development Law, attorneys David Goldstein and Jason Labate offer a case study of the Joint Operating Entity NYC (JOE NYC), which LISC has supported from its inception. The JOE NYC, a consortium of CDCs that have pooled their portfolios and expertise, is a blueprint that can help CDCs in other cities and regions shore up their stability in challenging markets and gain ground against the national affordability crisis.

3.08.2019 -

A LISC Leader Named “History Maker”—Just in Time for Women’s History Month

Candice Streett, executive director of LISC Virginia, has dedicated most of her working life to community development in Virginia. As she prepares to “downshift” from the position, she is being honored as a 2019 Richmond History Maker by the historic Valentine Museum, for her efforts on behalf of the city’s communities and her innovative economic development initiatives. In an interview with The Community Foundation, she reflects on the lessons from her journey. The most important one? “I’ve learned that we need to always listen first to those who have the most at stake—neighborhood residents.”

10.31.2018 -

Knowledge is Power: Reading the “Color of Law” in Milwaukee

Community transformation  demands a mosaic of resources, and one of the most important is knowledge—especially when it comes to understanding how government policy has shaped racial and income inequality in our neighborhoods. That’s why LISC Milwaukee has been sponsoring community book groups (90 in all) to read "The Color of Law" by Richard Rothstein, an indispensable narrative of how federal and local legislation created and enforced racial segregation across America over the course of the 20th century. To celebrate this community learning effort, Richard Rothstein visited Milwaukee to speak to residents and local leaders about his book and strategies for reversing segregation.

SSIR: Groundbreaking study looks at how neighborhood networks anchor community gains

In this week’s Stanford Social Innovation Review, LISC CEO Maurice A. Jones takes a close look at the outcomes from one of the largest single-city community development efforts in the country, the decade-long New Communities Program (NCP) in Chicago. Most notable, Jones writes, is data on community networks and how closely they connect to local growth and opportunity. The evidence confirms what community developers have long assumed but previously never proven: a durable local infrastructure of nonprofits, businesses, and other stakeholders is able to both attract and absorb capital in ways that measurably improve residents’ quality of life.

Home-Grown Talent Lifts Communities

LISC CEO Maurice A. Jones takes a hopeful look at the future in an interview with Philanthropy News Digest, pointing to the wealth of untapped talent in American communities as evidence that there are gains yet to come. "The question is, what do we do as a society to ensure that these people are able to fulfill their promise?” For LISC, that includes a range of local investments, from employment skills training to entrepreneurship to affordable housing development, all of which help expand economic opportunity and support a good quality of life.