LISC National
Where We Work

Quality-of-Life Neighborhoods


LISC prioritizes investments to organizations and institutions that have created a collective vision for their neighborhood, as formalized in a Quality-of-Life Plan (QOL), and are actively working toward that vision.

Near East

Located just outside the heart of downtown Indianapolis, the Near Eastside includes 20 different neighborhoods with 30,000-plus residents who actively seek to preserve the historic character and cultural diversity of the area. Its combination of green space, businesses, homes, and schools makes it a geographically convenient and asset-rich place to live, work, and play.

Contact

Emily Scott, Program Officer
Email

Near West

Bordered by White River Parkway, the Near West is within walking distance of IUPUI and downtown Indy. Incorporated as Indianapolis’s first suburb in 1888, it is among the oldest Indianapolis neighborhoods–and arguably one of its most diverse.

The Near West boasts easy access to downtown, 19 parks and recreational areas, and popular neighborhood eateries like Judge’s Tip of the Rib Barbecue and Working Man’s Friend. Surrounded by major state and national attractions such as the White River State Park museums, the Indianapolis Zoo, and the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, residents regard the Near West as one of the safest and most convenient places to live in Indianapolis.

Contact

Shelbi Cummings, Assistant Program Officer
Email

Northwest Area

The Northwest Area of Indianapolis is located just northwest of downtown Indianapolis. It is an urban residential neighborhood of 6 square miles, framed by high traffic commuter streets, an interstate highway, waterways, and a historic cemetery.  

The neighborhood has a unique and complex history. During the late 19th and early 20th century, it included Indianapolis’ Millionaire Row. Wealthy white pioneers of the early automobile industry were settling in the north and west areas of the community even as African-American families were settling in the south and eastern parts of the community.  

Construction and development plateaued in the years prior to World War II and declined thereafter, due in part to the middle class migration to the suburbs. From 1960 to the present day, the Northwest has been an almost exclusively African-American neighborhood of working class neighbors increasingly grappling with the impacts of population loss and disinvestment. 

Contact

Aaron Laramore, Senior Program Officer
Email

Northeast Corridor

The Northeast Corridor includes the diverse areas of King Park, Martindale Brightwood, Millersville at Fall Creek Valley, and United Northeast. It encompasses 14 neighborhood associations and boasts of the natural beauty of Fall Creek, the connectivity of the Monon Trail, and the State Fairgrounds as an anchor institution.

Contact

Aaron Laramore, Senior Program Officer
Email

Mid North

Developed in the early part of the 20th century when bridges and streetcars first crossed historic Fall Creek, the Mid-North neighborhood has a history of embracing innovation, integration, and education. In the heart of Indianapolis, Mid-North is now home to more than 10,000 residents from six neighborhoods that cover three square miles. What began in the 19th century as farmland with a few stopping points for travelers has since developed into the six neighborhoods that we know  today as Crown Hill, Highland Vicinity, Historic Meridian Park, Mapleton Fall Creek, Meridian Highland, and Watson-McCord.

Contact

Tosseia Holmes, Deputy Director
Email

SoIndy

Covering 8 square miles with a population of nearly 40,000, the South Indianapolis (SoIndy) Qol neighborhoods include Bean Creek, Garfield Park, University Heights, Carson Heights, Meridian Raymond, South Village, Northwest Perry and Rosedale Hills. The eight neighborhoods, with distinct history and identities, boast a range of housing options, commercial corridors serving local and regional needs, educational institutions from pre-k to graduate and recreational destinations. Equitable growth in all neighborhoods will occur with improved mass transit and connectivity, housing and workforce development and revitalization of commercial nodes and corridors creating opportunities for all who live, work and visit in SoIndy.

Contact

Tom Orr, Senior Program Officer
Email

Southeast

Connected to the Cultural Trail, sporting the city’s only cycle track, and home to duckpin bowling and an eclectic mix of restaurants and music venues, Southeast Indianapolis is one of the city’s oldest areas, consisting of a diverse set of neighborhoods: BatesHendricks, Fletcher Place, Fountain Square, Fountain Square Alliance, SECO, Irish Hill, Holy Rosary, North Square, Norwood Place, and Garfield Neighbors.

Contact

Gina Davis, Senior Program Officer
Email