Our Stories

4.09.2020 -

How Can Creative Placemaking Serve Us in this Moment? A Look Back to Look Forward

Ten years ago, the National Endowment for the Arts released the seminal publication “Creative Placemaking.” Written by Ann Markusen and Anne Gadwa Nicodemus, this white paper launched a movement grounded in harnessing design thinking, artistic practice and community-driven problem solving to build more creative and equitable communities.

2.12.2020 -

Tapping the Spirit of Milwaukee’s Historic Bronzeville

This Black History Month, we are honoring the legacy of commerce and culture that Milwaukee’s historic African American neighborhood bequeathed to its future residents. A new generation of community leaders and entrepreneurs are channeling that drive and creativity and forging a vibrant Bronzeville for the 21st century.

10.02.2019 -

The Enduring—and Enterprising—Heritage of Detroit’s Mexicantown

We are shining a spotlight on Detroit's nearly 100-year-old Mexicantown neighborhood, where residents and entrepreneurs who trace their roots to Mexico and other parts of Latin America have kept culture and small business alive and well through the city's highs and lows. (Top: Mural by Mexican-American artist Victor "Marka27" Quiñones; photo by Erik Howard, courtesy Detroit Metro Times)

9.25.2019 -

An Inaugural Local Leaders’ Institute Focuses on Creative Placemaking

National Endowment for the Arts and LISC brought six teams of partners from small, medium, and rural places together for the inaugural Local Leaders’ Institute on Creative Placemaking. At the two day convening in the summer of 2019, these local leaders shared community goals and ideas for implementation of creative placemaking projects designed to strengthen their local communities.

5.22.2019 -

LISC NYC’s Inclusive Creative Economy Fund, in Living Color

An in depth report from NY1 News explains how the Inclusive Creative Economy Fund has galvanized the future of a venerable downtown theater, La Mama. Thanks to a $3 million line of credit from LISC, the nearly 60-year-old institution, which has nurtured thousands of experimental artists and engages a broad diversity of audiences, is able to renovate its aging building and continue its valuable work. The fund’s model of raising debt capital from an array of impact investors to support creative economies and stimulate job growth, the report noted, can be scaled for communities across the country where real estate costs and other forces threaten local arts and culture.