Our Stories

1.23.2020 -

Advice for Women Getting Started in Male-Dominated Fields: Q&A with Claire Anderson

Claire Anderson is a Chicago-based engineer and manager of track construction at Union Pacific Railroad, which partners with LISC to expand access to stable, livable-wage jobs in rail and related sectors. Anderson recently sat down with LISC to discuss her career journey and why it’s important to her to help more women succeed in traditionally male-dominated fields.

Language and the Way We Think About Stigmatized Groups: Q&A with Esther Uduehi

LISC’s Emerging Leader Council member Esther Uduehi is a doctoral candidate at The Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania where her research focuses on the language associated with stigmatized groups and marginalized communities. Uduehi recently sat down with LISC to discuss how nonprofits and practitioners can put her findings to use, and the need to create more conversations using person-centered language.

1.14.2020 -

The Power of Neighborhood Connection

Since 2012, LISC Philadelphia has been supporting and honing the Community Connectors program, forging a model for resident engagement rooted in local places, that leverages local knowledge and strengths. An article in Generocity delves into the workings of the program, the neighborhood people who make it tick and how LISC’s sustained partnership has helped improve community connection, safety and wellbeing across the city.

1.08.2020 -

Christine Morris Named ED of LISC Hampton Roads

LISC has tapped the former chief resilience officer for the city of Norfolk as executive director of its new full-service program office in Hampton Roads, Va. Christine Morris will kick off work this month to lead LISC’s local investments in affordable housing, businesses, health and jobs—all designed to expand economic opportunity for residents.

11.21.2019 -

Meet the 2020 Rubinger Fellows: Ten Local Leaders Breaking Down Barriers

This year’s winners of the Michael Rubinger Community Fellowship award, the third cohort since the program’s inauguration in 2017, are passionately committeed to leveling barriers that stand in the way of equity for our country’s most vulnerable populations. The fellowship will enable each of the ten community leaders to pursue a cutting-edge project that furthers their personal and professional missions. “It is critical that local expertise and engagement are not just quietly nurtured but actively and persistently supported,” said Michael Rubinger, LISC’s former CEO for whom the fellowship is named, adding that this year’s fellows demonstrate, loud and clear, “the capacity to push the boundaries of the community development field so it can do more, do it faster and do it better.”