A Convening about Neighborhood Change, Displacement, and Equitable Development
Overview

A Convening about Neighborhood Change, Displacement, and Equitable Development

Anand Marri, VP & Head of Outreach and Education, Federal Reserve Bank of New York
Sam Marks, Executive Director, LISC New York City
Maurice Jones, President & CEO, LISC
Nani Coloretti, Deputy Secretary of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
From left: Andrew Haughwout, Federal Reserve Bank of New York; Nancy Mirabal, University of Maryland; Jackelyn Hwang, Princeton University; Ingrid Gould Ellen, NYU Wagner and NYU Furman Center; Karen Chapple, University of California, Berkeley
Denise Scott, Executive Vice President for Programs, LISC
Kai Wright, Features Editor of The Nation and host of WNYC’s podcast “There Goes The Neighborhood”
From left: Michelle de la Uz, Fifth Avenue Committee; Dina Levy, New York State Attorney General’s Office; Wendy Takahisa, Morgan Stanley; Karim Hutson, Genesis Companies, LLC
Patricia Swann, New York Community Trust
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A Convening about Neighborhood Change, Displacement, and Equitable Development

September 19, 2016

New York City, like other fast-growing U.S. cities, is grappling with the challenge of ensuring that economic growth and new investments in housing and other infrastructure spur equity and inclusion rather than result in the displacement of low-income residents. On September 19th, 2016, two hundred community development practitioners, policymakers, government officials, researchers, and funders came together to explore what the latest research tells us about neighborhood change and displacement, identify gaps in data, learn about anti-displacement and equitable development strategies from other cities, and discuss with key stakeholders the challenges and opportunities to implement effective anti-displacement initiatives in New York City.

The event, co-hosted by Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC) NYC, the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, and NYU Furman Center, consisted of a series of panels followed by discussions with the audience. It concluded with a moderated discussion between New York City government and elected officials and the audience, with the intent of moving toward concrete recommendations and actionable steps for equitable development in New York City.

The convening was made possible by major support from The New York Community Trust and additional support from the Charles H. Revson Foundation.

Goals:

  • Explore research agenda and data needed to measure and track neighborhood change and displacement 
  • Identify effective anti-displacement and equitable development tools and strategies 
  • Forge collaboration among key stakeholders to implement anti-displacement and equitable development strategies in New York City

 

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Additional support provided by the Charles H. Revson Foundation